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Peter Frohmader - Ritual Album
Performer: Peter Frohmader
Title: Ritual
Country: Sweden
Genre: Electronic
Style:Modern Classical, Ambient
Released: 1986
Catalog Number: MRC 001
Label: Multimood Records
MP3 album: 2303 mb
FLAC album: 1955 mb
TrackList
1Nightm:are2:50
2Magic3:50
3Monolith5:39
4Arrival5:19
5Trance5:04
6Ecstasy11:17
7Departure5:38
8Firmament5:29
Credits
  • Alto SaxophoneStefan Plett (tracks: B2, B3)
  • Composed By, Producer, Engineer, Cover, PerformerPeter Frohmader
  • Lacquer Cut ByPD
  • ViolinStephan Manus (tracks: A1, A4)
Notes
Recorded at Nekropolis Studio, Munich 1985

This LP was reissued on CD as part of CD2 in the Homunculus/Ritual 2CD set
Barcodes
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A runout, etched): MRC 001 A PD-CR LP
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B runout, etched): MRC 001 B PD-CR LP
  • Rights Society: GEMA
Companies
  • Recorded At – Nekropolis Studio
  • Lacquer Cut At – Cutting Room
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Related to Peter Frohmader - Ritual
Reviews: (1)
Gholbithris
Gholbithris
Peter's latest release is quite different to any of his previous albums, almost entirely electronic and quite forcibly rhythmic. The style leans towards that of Asmus Tietchens and occasionally towards The Residents (instrumental style circa MARK OF THE MOLE), the rhythms being like 'Ritual' dances with lots of synths and electronic effects.Of the 8 cuts on this album, my favourites are Monolith with its surging rhythm (very good use of rhythm composer and electronic drums), and excellent violin solo from Stephan Manus, and Ecstasy which is so much like Asmus Tietchens at his rhythmic best, a bolero like rhythm which runs full throttle, intensifying and becoming more complex as it progresses, a very emotional piece which displays the mood of the title quite aptly.Overall, it's a far more accessible album than most of his previous releases, and is recommended for those who like rhythmic synth music with a difference, not extremely weird, nor commercial.
by Alan & Steve Freeman, first published in Audion 1 (1986)